OUR WHY

“The difference that outstanding school principals make in the lives of young people cannot be overstated.”

John B. King, Jr.
Former U.S. Secretary of Education

We are catalysts for change. 

 

We exist to transform students’ lives for the better, to help them achieve what they never thought possible.

 

The 2021–2022 school year was—again—unprecedented. Although many students returned to in-person learning, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continued to impact lives and disrupt education. Society continued to grapple with examples of social injustice and systemic racism highlighted in new and continuing ways.

 

These challenges compounded issues and barriers to learning already prevalent in urban education and, specifically, Philadelphia. The need for the acceleration of learning and increased academic achievement is clear; the steps we take today to advance leadership development are paramount in creating a brighter future for Philadelphia students.

“It is difficult to envision an investment in K-12 education with a higher ceiling on its potential return than a successful effort to improve principal leadership.”

Grisson, Egalite, and Lindsay
2021

 

Working with school and system leaders, we shifted our programming strategy and design to focus our full efforts and resources on supporting them in meeting these extraordinary challenges. Principals and system leaders can make an enormous difference in the lives of young people. These leaders have a tremendous impact in the push to improve education in Philadelphia.

 

Data from research conducted in 2021 and 2022 reinforces what we’ve always known: EXEMPLARY LEADERSHIP BUILDS EXEMPLARY SCHOOLS.

“A principal’s ability to create positive working conditions and collaborative, supportive learning environments plays a critical role in attracting and retaining qualified teachers and developing schools.”

Grisson et al
2
021

“Principals are a critical school-level factor influencing student outcomes, including student achievement, graduation rates, and attendance rates.”

Grisson et al
Former U.S. Secretary of Education